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How many Manzil in Quran?Complete Guide

how many manzil in Quran
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what does manzil mean?

Manzils of the Quran is your way to the better recitation of the Quran. The Quran is the word of God, revealed to His Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, the miraculous with its wording, and the worshiper with its recitation. It starts with Surat Al-Fatihah and ends with Surat Al-Nas. And it is transmitted to us frequently.

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how many manzils are in Quran?

The Quran’s division into seven Manzil is a well-established tradition. Below are the details of each Manzil:

First Manzil: Al-Fatihah (1) through An-Nisa’ (4)

The First Manzil of the Quran encompasses four chapters, starting with Al-Fatihah and extending through An-Nisa’. This section is rich in content and provides a foundational understanding of key Islamic principles.

Al-Fatihah (Chapter 1)

Al-Fatihah, known as “The Opening,” is a concise chapter consisting of seven verses. It is recited in every unit of Muslims’ prayers (Salah). This chapter is a beautiful supplication for guidance, lordship, and mercy from Allah.

Al-Baqarah (Chapter 2)

Al-Baqarah, “The Cow,” is the longest chapter in the Quran. It covers various themes, including guidance for personal development, laws for social justice, and narratives of previous prophets. It also emphasizes the importance of faith, morality, and community life.

Al-Imran (Chapter 3)

Named after the family of Imran, this chapter continues the themes of guidance, family ethics, and social justice. It includes the story of Jesus’s mother, Mary, and emphasizes the unity of the Muslim community.

An-Nisa’ (Chapter 4)

An-Nisa‘, “The Women,” focuses on social reform, particularly regarding women’s rights and family matters. It provides detailed guidance on inheritance, marriage, and the treatment of orphans.

Second Manzil: Al-Maida (5) through At-Tawba (9)

The Second Manzil of the Quran consists of five chapters, from Al-Maida to At-Tawba. This section is particularly significant for its focus on legal matters, ethics, and personal responsibility.

Al-Maida (Chapter 5)

Al-Maida, “The Table Spread,” provides detailed guidance on dietary laws, legal matters, and moral conduct. It emphasizes the importance of fulfilling covenants and the proper conduct of relationships, both with fellow human beings and with Allah.

Al-An’am (Chapter 6)

Al-An’am, “The Cattle,” delves into the themes of monotheism and the rejection of polytheism. It also discusses various aspects of guidance and the natural signs that point to the existence and oneness of Allah.

Al-A’raf (Chapter 7)

Al-A’raf, “The Heights,” explores the stories of several prophets, including Adam, Noah, and Moses. It emphasizes the importance of following divine guidance and the consequences of turning away from it.

Al-Anfal (Chapter 8)

Al-Anfal, “The Spoils of War,” provides guidelines for conduct during warfare, including the treatment of prisoners and the distribution of spoils. It emphasizes the importance of unity, discipline, and trust in Allah during times of conflict.

At-Tawba (Chapter 9)

At-Tawba, “The Repentance,” is unique as it does not begin with the phrase “In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful.” This chapter deals with issues related to warfare, treaties, and the responsibilities of the Muslim community. It calls for sincerity in faith and action.

Third Manzil: Yunus (10) through An-Nahl (16)

The Third Manzil of the Quran encompasses seven chapters, from Yunus to An-Nahl. This section is rich in themes related to faith, guidance, and the relationship between human beings and the natural world.

Yunus (Chapter 10)

Named after the Prophet Yunus (Jonah), this chapter emphasizes the importance of patience, trust in Allah, and the consequences of denying the Prophets. It also illustrates the signs of Allah’s existence in the natural world.

Hud (Chapter 11)

This chapter, named after the Prophet Hud, focuses on the stories of several prophets, including Noah, Abraham, and Moses. It emphasizes the importance of righteousness, adherence to Allah’s guidance, and the consequences of rejecting the truth.

Yusuf (Chapter 12)

Yusuf (Joseph) is the only chapter in the Quran that focuses on the detailed story of a single prophet. It narrates the story of Prophet Yusuf’s trials, patience, and ultimate triumph, providing lessons in trust, patience, and reliance on Allah.

Ar-Ra’d (Chapter 13)

Ar-Ra’d, “The Thunder,” discusses the signs of Allah’s existence in nature, such as thunder and lightning. It emphasizes the importance of recognizing these signs and reflecting on the greatness of the Creator.

Ibrahim (Chapter 14)

Named after the Prophet Ibrahim (Abraham), this chapter focuses on the importance of gratitude towards Allah and the consequences of ingratitude. It also emphasizes the importance of following divine guidance.

Al-Hijr (Chapter 15)

Al-Hijr, named after the ancient city of the people of Thamud, discusses the stories of several prophets and the rejection they faced. It emphasizes the importance of patience and trust in Allah’s wisdom.

An-Nahl (Chapter 16)

An-Nahl, “The Bee,” explores various natural phenomena, such as the creation of the bee and other creatures. It emphasizes the importance of reflecting on these signs and recognizing Allah’s wisdom and creativity.

Fourth Manzil: Isra’ (17) through Al-Furqan (25)

Isra’ (Chapter 17)

Isra’, “The Night Journey,” recounts the miraculous night journey of the Prophet Muhammad. It emphasizes the importance of prayer, the relationship between parents and children, and the principles of justice and morality.

Al-Kahf (Chapter 18)

Al-Kahf, “The Cave,” contains various narratives, including the story of the People of the Cave, Moses and Khidr, and Dhul-Qarnayn. It emphasizes faith, patience, knowledge, and reliance on Allah.

Maryam (Chapter 19)

Named after Mary, the mother of Jesus, this chapter focuses on the stories of several prophets, including Zachariah, John, Abraham, and Moses. It emphasizes the importance of compassion, mercy, and trust in Allah.

Ta-Ha (Chapter 20)

Ta-Ha narrates the story of Moses and his mission to free the Children of Israel. It emphasizes the importance of reliance on Allah, patience, and steadfastness in the face of adversity.

Al-Anbiya (Chapter 21)

Al-Anbiya, “The Prophets,” discusses the stories of various prophets and the common message they brought. It emphasizes the oneness of Allah and the importance of following His guidance.

Al-Hajj (Chapter 22)

Al-Hajj, “The Pilgrimage,” discusses various aspects of the Hajj pilgrimage and the spiritual significance of this important Islamic practice. It also emphasizes the unity of the Muslim community.

Al-Mu’minun (Chapter 23)

Al-Mu’minun, “The Believers,” focuses on the characteristics of true believers and the importance of moral conduct, prayer, and humility.

Al-Nur (Chapter 24)

Al-Nur, “The Light,” provides guidance on social ethics, including modesty, chastity, and the proper conduct of relationships. It emphasizes the importance of following Allah’s guidance in all aspects of life.

Al-Furqan (Chapter 25)

Al-Furqan, “The Criterion,” emphasizes the importance of recognizing the truth and distinguishing it from falsehood. It encourages reflection on the natural world and adherence to divine guidance.

Fifth Manzil: Ash-Shuara’ (26) through Ya-Seen (36)

The Fifth Manzil of the Quran consists of eleven chapters, from Ash-Shuara’ to Ya-Seen. This section emphasizes the power of Allah, the importance of following His guidance, and the role of the prophets in conveying His message.

Ash-Shuara’ (Chapter 26)

Ash-Shuara’, “The Poets,” recounts the stories of various prophets, including Moses, Abraham, and Noah. It emphasizes the importance of following divine guidance and the consequences of rejecting the prophets.

An-Naml (Chapter 27)

An-Naml, “The Ant,” includes the story of Solomon and his ability to communicate with animals. It emphasizes wisdom, gratitude, and the signs of Allah’s existence in the natural world.

Al-Qasas (Chapter 28)

Al-Qasas, “The Stories,” focuses on the story of Moses and his mission to guide the Children of Israel. It emphasizes trust in Allah, patience, and the importance of following divine guidance.

Al-Ankabut (Chapter 29)

Al-Ankabut, “The Spider,” discusses the fragility of associating partners with Allah and the importance of true faith. It emphasizes the trials of faith and the importance of perseverance.

Ar-Rum (Chapter 30)

Ar-Rum, “The Romans,” emphasizes the signs of Allah’s existence in the natural world and human history. It encourages reflection on these signs and recognition of Allah’s power and wisdom.

Luqman (Chapter 31)

Named after the wise Luqman, this chapter emphasizes wisdom, gratitude, and proper conduct. It includes Luqman’s advice to his son, providing timeless guidance for personal development.

As-Sajda (Chapter 32)

As-Sajda, “The Prostration,” emphasizes the importance of humility, prostration, and recognition of Allah’s greatness. It encourages reflection on the creation and the Hereafter.

Al-Ahzab (Chapter 33)

Al-Ahzab, “The Combined Forces,” discusses various social and historical events, including the Battle of the Trench. It emphasizes the importance of unity, trust in Allah, and proper conduct.

Saba’ (Chapter 34)

Saba’, “Sheba,” discusses the story of the Queen of Sheba and Solomon. It emphasizes wisdom, reflection on the natural world, and the importance of recognizing Allah’s signs.

Fatir (Chapter 35)

Fatir, “The Originator,” emphasizes Allah’s creative power and the importance of recognizing His signs in the natural world. It encourages gratitude and trust in Allah’s wisdom.

Ya-Seen (Chapter 36)

Ya-Seen is often referred to as the “Heart of the Quran.” It emphasizes the importance of following the prophets, recognizing Allah’s signs, and preparing for the Hereafter.

Sixth Manzil: Qaf (chapter 50) through An-Nas (chapter 114), consisting of 65 chapters

The Sixth Manzil of the Quran is a substantial section, consisting of 65 chapters from Qaf to An-Nas. This part of the Quran covers a wide range of themes, including divine wisdom, human behavior, morality, guidance, and supplication.

Qaf (Chapter 50)

Qaf emphasizes the reality of the Resurrection and the signs of Allah’s existence in the natural world. It encourages reflection on life, death, and the Hereafter.

Adh-Dhariyat to Al-Hadid (Chapters 51-57)

These chapters cover various aspects of faith, social justice, divine wisdom, and human responsibility. They emphasize the importance of recognizing Allah’s signs and following His guidance.

Al-Mujadila to At-Tahrim (Chapters 58-66)

This section focuses on social ethics, family relations, and personal conduct. It provides guidance on various aspects of daily life, emphasizing the importance of morality and righteousness.

Al-Mulk to Al-Mursalat (Chapters 67-77)

These chapters emphasize the greatness of Allah, the reality of the Hereafter, and the importance of recognizing Allah’s signs in the natural world. They encourage reflection, gratitude, and trust in Allah’s wisdom.

An-Naba to An-Nas (Chapters 78-114)

The concluding chapters of the Quran are often recited in daily prayers. They cover various themes, including the Resurrection, divine mercy, protection from evil, and supplication. They provide concise guidance for personal development and spiritual growth.

Seventh Manzil: 

the traditional division of the Quran into Manzil comprises six parts, not seven. The division into seven parts is known as the division into “Ajzaa” or “Hizb,” and each part is referred to as a “Juz.”

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What is the purpose of Manzil in the Quran?

The purpose of dividing the Quran into Manzil is primarily to facilitate the recitation of the entire Quran over a specific period, typically one week. Each Manzil represents a portion of the Quran to be recited in one day, allowing for the complete recitation of the Quran in seven days. Here’s a more detailed look at the purpose of Manzil in the Quran:

  1. Structured Recitation: The division into Manzil provides a structured approach to reciting the Quran. By following the Manzil, a person can complete the recitation of the Quran in a week, making it a practical guide for regular engagement with the text.

  2. Ease of Recitation: The division ensures that the daily recitation is approximately equal in length, making it manageable for those who wish to maintain a consistent daily practice.

  3. Spiritual Practice: Many Muslims aim to recite the entire Quran, especially during the month of Ramadan. The division into Manzil helps in achieving this spiritual goal by providing a clear and systematic plan for recitation.

  4. Accessibility: The division into Manzil makes the recitation of the entire Quran more accessible, even for those who may not have extensive experience in reciting the Quran. It breaks down the text into manageable portions, encouraging more people to engage with the Quran regularly.

  5. Connection with the Divine: Regular recitation of the Quran is considered a virtuous act in Islam, fostering a deeper connection with the Divine. The division into Manzil supports this spiritual practice by providing a clear pathway for engaging with the Quran’s teachings.

 
 

When did the manzils of the Quran start?

This division took place during the era of Al-Hajjaj bin Yusuf Al-Thaqafi, the governor of Iraq during the period of the Caliph of the Muslims, Abdul Malik bin Marwan, when he ordered the formation and grouping of the Qur’an, and this division, was to facilitate memorization and recitation.

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How can you recite the Qur’an in a week?

Suppose you want to recite the Qur’an and finish it in a week. In that case, you will divide Qur’an based on the way the companions used to read the Qur’an. As we mentioned previously, you could recite and finish the recitation of the whole Quran in 7 days by following this order, three surahs, five surahs, seven surahs, nine Surahs, eleven surahs, and thirteen surahs.

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How can you recite the Qur’an in two weeks?

If you want to recite the Qur’an and finish it in two weeks, you have to read 8 pages after each of the five daily prayers: Fajr, Dhuhr, Asr, Maghrib, and Isha.

How can you recite the Qur’an in a month?

If you want to recite the Qur’an and finish it in a month, you have to read 4 pages after each of the five daily prayers: Fajr, Dhuhr, Asr, Maghrib, and Isha.

Why Do You Need to Use the Manzils of the Quran?

Based on what is mentioned earlier and the opinion of Quran scholars, the division of the Qur’an, Manzil, is found in the Qur’an of the Muslims is discretionary. It originates in the actions of the Companions of the Prophet (PBUH), and the meaning is not. It is devotional, but it is to facilitate the recitation of the Qur’an.

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